• Self-Esteem K-5

    Kindergarten

    1.    ASCA standards: PS:A1.1  develop positive attitudes toward self as a unique and worthy person, PS:A1.10 identify personal strengths and assets, PS:A2.3  recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences, PS:A2.4  recognize, accept and appreciate ethnic and cultural diversity. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.K.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.K.5, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.K.1

    2.    Essential Question(s): 

    How are you like others? How are you different from others? What are some things that you are good at? 

     

    3.    Target Question(s):

    What makes you a unique person? Should you ever try to be like someone else?

     

    4.    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to accept the differences of others, so they can work with all people in the work force. Students will learn how to have a high self-esteem, so they can be confident when preparing for the future.

     

    5.    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    CW discuss how everyone is unique. CW read I Like Myself. SW discuss some of the things that the girl liked about herself. SW name ways they are like the other students and ways they are different. SW tell one thing they like about themselves. SW draw a picture of themselves and write “I Like Myself” on the paper.

    6.    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    SW share will the group their picture and the things they like about themselves. SW be able to identify their strengths and assets. SW be able to accept the differences of others.

     

    7.    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    I Like Myself By Karen Beaumont, Drawing paper

    8.    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to share their pictures with the group identifying what they like about themselves.

     

     

    First Grade

    1.     ASCA standards: PS:A1.1  develop positive attitudes toward self as a unique and worthy person, PS:A1.10 identify personal strengths and assets, PS:A2.3  recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences, PS:A2.4  recognize, accept and appreciate ethnic and cultural diversity.  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.1.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.5

     

    2.    Essential Question(s): 

    How are you like others? How are you different from others? What are some things that you are good at?

     

    3.    Target Question(s):

    What makes you a unique person? Should you ever try to be like someone else?

     

    4.    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to accept the differences of others, so they can work with all people in the work force. Students will learn how to have a high self-esteem, so they can be confident when preparing for the future.

     

    5.    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    CW discuss how everyone is unique. CW read I’m Gonna Like Me. SW discuss some of the things that the girl and boy liked about themselves. SW name ways they are like the other students and ways they are different. SW tell one thing they like about themselves. SW both of their hands on construction paper. Students will cut out their hands and write their name on the back. Students will partner with the person next to them and exchange one of their hands. Students should have one hand with their name on it and one hand with a friend’s name on it. Students will write one thing they like about themselves on the hand with their name on it, and one thing they like about the person whose name is on the hand they received from their friend. CW staple the hands together for the classroom.

     

    6.    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

     

    SW be able to identify their strengths and assets. SW be able to accept the differences of others.

     

    7.    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    I’m Gonna Like Me by Jamie lee Curtis, Construction paper

     

    8.    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to share their hands with the group identifying what they liked about themselves.

     

     

    Second Grade

     ASCA standards:  PS:A1.1  develop positive attitudes toward self as a unique and worthy person, PS:A1.10 identify personal strengths and assets, PS:A2.3  recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences, PS:A2.4  recognize, accept and appreciate ethnic and cultural diversity. CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.2

     

    2.    Essential Question(s): 

    How are you like others? How are you different from others? What are some things that you are good at?

     

    3.    Target Question(s):

    What makes you a unique person? Should you ever try to be like someone else?

     

    4.    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to accept the differences of others, so they can work with all people in the work force. Students will learn how to have a high self-esteem, so they can be confident when preparing for the future.

     

    5.    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    CW discuss how everyone is unique. CW read It’s Okay to be Different. SW compare and contrast how they are different and alike other students. SW complete “I am Special” flower writing things that make them special on the leaves. SW share their flower with the group telling what they like about themselves.

     

    6.    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

     

    SW be able to identify their strengths and assets. SW be able to accept the differences of others.

     

    7.    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    It’s Okay to be Different by Todd Parr

    8.    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to share their flower with the group identifying what they liked about themselves.

     

     

    Third Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA standards:

    1.    PS:A1.1  develop positive attitudes toward self as a unique and worthy person, PS:A1.10 identify personal strengths and assets, PS:A2.3  recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences, PS:A2.4  recognize, accept and appreciate ethnic and cultural diversity, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1.B, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.6

     

    2.    Essential Question(s): 

    How are you like others? How are you different from others? What are some things that you are good at?

     

    3.    Target Question(s):

    What makes you a unique person? Should you ever try to be like someone else?

     

    4.    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to accept the differences of others, so they can work with all people in the work force. Students will learn how to have a high self-esteem, so they can be confident when preparing for the future.

     

    5.    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    Counselor will discuss how everyone is unique and has special qualities. Students will compare and contrast how they are different and alike other students. Counselor will read: Carla’s Sandwich. Counselor will discuss how Carla wanted to be different from the other students. Counselor will discuss how Carla responded to those students who teased her because she was different. Students will design their own sandwich from pieces of construction paper. They will write one quality that makes them special on each piece of their sandwich. On the first piece of bread they will write “I am Unique.”

    6.    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    SW be able to identify their strengths and assets. SW be able to accept the differences of others.

     

    7.    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    Carla’s Sandwich by Debbie Herman

    8.    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to share their sandwich with the group identifying what they liked about themselves.

     

     

    Fourth Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA standards:

    1.    PS:A1.1  develop positive attitudes toward self as a unique and worthy person, PS:A1.10 identify personal strengths and assets, PS:A2.3  recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences, PS:A2.4  recognize, accept and appreciate ethnic and cultural diversity, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.9, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1.B,

     

    2.    Essential Question(s): 

    How are you like others? How are you different from others? What are some things that you are good at?

     

    3.    Target Question(s):

    What makes you a unique person? Should you ever try to be like someone else?

     

    4.    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to accept the differences of others, so they can work with all people in the work force. Students will learn how to have a high self-esteem, so they can be confident when preparing for the future.

     

    5.    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    CW discuss how everyone is unique. SW compare and contrast how they are different and alike other students.  CW discuss how families in medieval times showed they were different from other families. Counselor will show pictures of family crests or coat of arms. SW discuss what the symbols on these crests could mean. Students will decorate their own coat of arms drawing things they like about themselves or achievements they have had.

     

    6.    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    SW be able to identify their strengths and assets. SW be able to accept the differences of others.

     

    7.    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    Personal Coat of Arms, pictures of family crests

     

    8.    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to share their personal coat of arms with the group identifying what they like about themselves.

     

     

    Fifth Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA standards:

    1.    PS:A1.1  develop positive attitudes toward self as a unique and worthy person, PS:A1.10 identify personal strengths and assets, PS:A2.3  recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences, PS:A2.4  recognize, accept and appreciate ethnic and cultural diversity, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1.B

     

    2.    Essential Question(s): 

    How are you like others? How are you different from others? What are some things that you are good at?

     

    3.    Target Question(s):

    What makes you a unique person? Should you ever try to be like someone else?

     

    4.    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to accept the differences of others, so they can work with all people in the work force. Students will learn how to have a high self-esteem, so they can be confident when preparing for the future.

     

    5.    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    CW discuss how everyone is unique. SW compare and contrast how they are different and alike other students.

    Students will complete “News about Me” which is a newspaper describing their themselves, their family, what kind of friend they are, 3 careers they are interested in, and what goals they want to meet this year. Students will show the group their newspaper describing themselves.

     

    6.    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    SW be able to identify their strengths and assets. SW be able to accept the differences of others.

     

    7.    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    “News about Me”

     

    8.    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to share their newspapers with the group identifying what they liked about themselves.

     

     

     

     

     

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  • Goal Setting K-5


    Kindergarten

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): : ASCA Standards: C:A1.6  learn how to set goals, PS:A1.3  learn the goal-setting process, A:A1.1  articulate feelings of competence and confidence as learners, A:B2.6  understand the relationship between classroom performance and success in school, C:C1.2  explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.K.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.K.1

    Essential Question(s):  What is a goal? What steps should you take to meet a goal?  What can you tell yourself when you are trying to meet a goal?

    Target Question(s): What is your goal for school? Should you ever give up?  How will you achieve your goal?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to set goals and the steps it takes to meet a goal, so they can successfully reach their goals for the future.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    What is a goal? When you run a race, how do you know which way to run? The goal of the race is to reach the finish line. We can’t reach the finish line if we give up. The Little Engine had a goal, so let’s find out how he met his goal.

    Counselor will read The Little Engine That Could. How did the engine get up the mountain? (did not give up) What did the other engines say about the little engine? (he could not do it) What is something that you could not do last year? What is something new that you can do this year? What is something hard for you to do that you have not learned to do yet and you want to learn to do?

    Students will name a goal for the week. 1. Picture yourself doing it. (Close eyes and picture it) 2. Say, “I CAN”. 3. Think about how to do it. 4.  Go for it. 5. Tell yourself “Good Job!” 6. Should you ever give up and stop trying?

    Students will make a hat that says “I can” and write the goal on the hat. Students will form a train and walk around the room, saying “I think I can” going up the mountain (very slowly) and “I know I can” going down the mountain (faster).

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Students will state their goal they wrote on their hat and how they will meet their goal.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper, 4” strips of 12”X18” construction paper

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to state the goal they wrote on their hat and how they will meet their goal.

    First Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA C:A1.6  learn how to set goals, PS:A1.3  learn the goal-setting process, A:A1.1  articulate feelings of competence and confidence as learners, A:B2.6  understand the relationship between classroom performance and success in school, C:C1.2  explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.1

    Essential Question(s):  What is a goal? What steps should you take to meet a goal?  What can you tell yourself when you are trying to meet a goal?

     

    Target Question(s): What is your goal for school? Should you ever give up?  How will you achieve your goal?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to set goals and the steps it takes to meet a goal, so they can successfully reach their goals for the future.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

     

    What is a goal? (a goal is something you want to try to do or achieve) When you run a race, how do you know which way to run?  The goal of the race is to reach the finish line. You can’t reach the finish line if you give up. Grace had a goal, so let’s find out how she met her goal. Counselor will read “Amazing Grace.”

    What was Grace’s goal? What did the other students say about Grace? Did Grace give up when others said she could not do it? Was Grace diligent to keep her goal? What is something new that you learned to do this year in school? What is something hard for you to do that you have not learned to do yet and you want to learn to do it?

    Students will name a goal for the week. 1. Picture yourself doing it. (Close eyes and picture it) 2. Say, “I CAN”. 3. Think about how to do it. 4.  Go for it. 5. Tell yourself “Good Job!” 6. Should you ever give up and stop trying?

    Students will write the goal for school on “My Goal for School”.

     

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Students will state their goal they wrote and how they will meet their goal.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

     

    Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman, “My Goal for School”

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

     

    All students will be able to state the goal they wrote and how they will meet their goal.

     

     

    Second Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA C:A1.6  learn how to set goals, PS:A1.3  learn the goal-setting process, PS:B1.9  identify long- and short-term goals A:A1.1  articulate feelings of competence and confidence as learners, A:B2.6  understand the relationship between classroom performance and success in school, C:C1.2  explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.3, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1.A

    Essential Question(s):  What is a goal? What steps should you take to meet a goal?  What can you tell yourself when you are trying to meet a goal?

    Target Question(s): What is your goal for school? Should you ever give up?  How will you achieve your goal?

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to set goals and the steps it takes to meet a goal, so they can successfully reach their goals for the future.

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    What is a goal? Something you want to happen in your life, something you want to do or achieve. What is the difference between a long-term goal and a short term goal? Goals you achieve in a short amount of time are short-term goals, like making your A/R points for the 9 weeks. A long-term goal takes a long time to achieve, like becoming President of the United States. Use your hands to show me which goals are long-term (hands wide apart) or short-term (hands close together): bake a cake, publish a best-selling book, learn to play a new video game, graduate from high school. Some people expect to reach their long term goals very quickly, so they did discouraged. You have to be patient and set small goals for yourself along the way. You should never give up. (show Wagner the puppet) Wagner has a goal to learn to spell. If he made 100 on his spelling test, his teacher would put a gold star on it. Wagner pictured himself making a gold star on his spelling test. He told himself, “I can do it.” He thought of how he could make a 100. He -decided to write his spelling words 10 times each every day. When he took the spelling test, he only made an 80. Did he give up? No. He worked even harder the next week. He wrote his spelling words 10 times each every day, and he asked a friend to call out his spelling words, so he could practice taking the test. The next week he made 100 on his test. He told himself, “Good Job!” Was Wagner diligent to keep his goal?  Students will name one area they excel in at school and one area they need extra help. What goal can you set for yourself to help you become successful in the classroom? Students will set their goal and close their eyes and visualize their goal. Students will brainstorm ways to meet their goal. Students will complete “Go for your Goal” setting a goal for themselves for school. Students will create a goal chart that they will take with them and chart their progress for the week.

    1.       Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Student will share their goal with the group and the how they will achieve it.

    2.       Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    “Go for the Goal” by Mendez Foundation,My Goal Chart

    3.       Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to state the goal they wrote and how they will meet their goal.

     

    Third Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA C:A1.6  learn how to set goals, PS:A1.3  learn the goal-setting process, PS:B1.9  identify long- and short-term goals A:A1.1  articulate feelings of competence and confidence as learners, A:B2.6  understand the relationship between classroom performance and success in school, C:C1.2  explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction,  PS:A2.1  recognize that everyone has rights and responsibilities.   CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.3, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1.B, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1

     

    Essential Question(s):  What is a goal? What steps should you take to meet a goal?  What can you tell yourself when you are trying to meet a goal?

     

    Target Question(s): What is your goal for school? Should you ever give up?  How will you achieve your goal?

     

    1.       Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to set goals and the steps it takes to meet a goal, so they can successfully reach their goals for the future.

     

    2.       Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    .    What is a goal? What is the difference between long term goals and short term goals? Students will name some long and short term goals. Why are goals important? What happens when you do not have goals? Some people expect to reach their long term goals very quickly, so they did discouraged. You have to be patient and set small goals for yourself along the way. You should never give up.  Counselor will read Salt in His Shoes. What was Michael Jordan’s goal? How did he reach his goal? Was he determined to reach his goal? What did Michael do when Mark made fun of him? Michael had a dream. Do you have a dream? Success starts in school today. Students will name one area they excel in at school and one area they need extra help. What goal can you set for yourself to help you become successful in the classroom? Students will set their goal and close their eyes and visualize their goal. Students will brainstorm ways to meet their goal. Students will complete “Go for your Goal” setting a goal for themselves for school.

     

    3.       Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Student will share their goal with the group and the how they will achieve it.

     

    4.       Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    Salt in His Shoes by Deloris Jordan, “Go for the Goal” Basketball

     

     

    5.       Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to state the goal they wrote and how they will meet their goal.

     

    Fourth Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks):

    ASCA: C:A1.6  learn how to set goals, PS:A1.3  learn the goal-setting process, PS:B1.9  identify long- and short-term goals,  A:A1.1  articulate feelings of competence and confidence as learners, C:C1.2  explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction, C:C1.1 understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1.B, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1.C

     

    Essential Question(s):  What is a goal? What steps should you take to meet a goal?  What can you tell yourself when you are trying to meet a goal?

    Target Question(s): What is your goal for school? Should you ever give up?  How will you achieve your goal?

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

     

    Students will learn how to set goals and the steps it takes to meet a goal, so they can successfully reach their goals for the future.

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

     

    What is a goal? What is the difference between long term goals and short term goals? Name some short term goals. Name some long  term goals. Why are goals important? What happens when you do not have goals? What are the rules of soccer? You must take the ball  down the field to score a goal. How can you make a goal? You must focus on the ball. Other players may try to distract you and take the ball away from you, but you have to keep your focus on the ball to make the goal. Other players can help you score the goal. Name one area where you need help and one area where you are strong in school. What goal can you set for yourself to help you become successful  in the classroom? How is making a goal in soccer similar to meeting your goal in school? You must focus on your goal just like the soccer ball to make your goal. Even when other students try to distract you, you must keep your focus on the goal. Other students can help you meet your  goal.  What does visualization mean? You have to see something in your mind before you can accomplish it. Students will set their goal and close their eyes and visualize their goal. Students will brainstorm ways to meet their goal. Counselor will tell the steps she took to become a school counselor. Student will complete “My Goal for School” (on a soccer ball) stating their goal, steps they will take to achieve their goal, and who will help them achieve their goal. Students will decide how they will keep their goal before their eyes.

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Students will read to the group “My Goal for School” stating their goal, steps they will take to achieve their goal, and who will help them achieve their  goal.

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

     

    My Goal for School

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

     

    All students will be able to state the goal they wrote and how they will meet their goal.

     

    Fifth Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks):

    ASCA: C:A1.6  learn how to set goals, PS:A1.3  learn the goal-setting process, PS:B1.9  identify long- and short-term goals,  A:A1.1  articulate feelings of competence and confidence as learners, C:C1.2  explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction,  CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1.B, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1.C

     

     

    Essential Question(s):  What is a goal? What steps should you take to meet a goal?  What can you tell yourself when you are trying to meet a goal?

     

    Target Question(s): What is your goal for school? Should you ever give up?  How will you achieve your goal?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to set goals and the steps it takes to meet a goal, so they can successfully reach their goals for the future.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice) 

    What is a goal? What is the difference between long term goals and short term goals? Name some short term goals. Name some long term goals. Why are goals important? What happens when you do not have goals? Name some people that you know that had a goal and they achieved it. What does visualization mean? You have to see something in your mind before you can accomplish it. Counselor will discuss why it is important to visualize your goal. Students will stand up and put one arm behind their back as far as they can without twisting their body. Students will put their arm down, close their eyes, and visualize for 30 seconds putting their arm behind their back as far as they can. Students will open their eyes and put their arm behind their back as far as they can. Students will name one area they excel in at school and one area they need extra help. What goal can you set for yourself to help you become successful in the classroom? Students will set their goal and close their eyes and visualize their goal. Students will brainstorm ways to meet their goal. Counselor will tell the steps she took to become a school counselor. Student will complete “My Goals for School” stating their goal, steps they will take to achieve their goal, and who will help them achieve their goal. Students will decide how they will keep their goal before their eyes.

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?) Student will complete “My Goals for School” stating their goal, steps they will take to achieve their goal, and who will help them achieve their goal.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    My Goals for School

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

     

    All students will be able to state the goal they wrote and how they will meet their goal.

     

     


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  • Careers K-5


    Kindergarten

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): : ASCA Standards: C:A1.2 learn about the variety of traditional and nontraditional occupations,  C:C1.1 understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.K.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.K.1

     

    Essential Question(s):  What is a career? What are some tools that workers use in their job?

     

    Target Question(s): What is your job today? How does your success in the classroom today affect your future success?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn about various careers and the tools they use. Students will learn how their job as a student today can affect their future success.

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

     

     What is a career? What kind of career do you think you would like to have in the future? Counselor will read Whose Tools Are These? Whose Vehicle Is This?, and Whose Hat Is This?. Students will play a game by guessing the answers of the questions in the books. Students will be given a game marker for each correct answer they get. The student who has the most markers wins the game. What is your job today? How can you be successful at being a student? If you do not do a good job as being a student, then it will be difficult to have a good job in the future. Your future depends on what you do today.

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

     

    Students will complete “Workers Use Special Tools” and “Workers Wear Hats”. Students must draw a line from the picture of the tool to the worker or from the worker to the hat.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

     

    Whose Tools Are These? by Sharon Katz Cooper, Whose Vehicle Is This? by Sharon Katz Cooper, Whose Hat Is This? by Sharon Katz Cooper, “Workers Use Special Tools”, “Workers Wear Hats”

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to state what their job is today and how they will be successful at their job.

    First Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA C:A1.2  learn about the variety of traditional and nontraditional occupations,  C:C1.1 understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.1.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.2

     

    Essential Question(s):  What is a career? What are some tools that workers use in their job? 

     

    Target Question(s): What is your job today? How does your success in the classroom today affect your future success?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn about various careers and the tools they use. Students will learn how their job as a student today can affect their future success.

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

     What is a career? What kind of career do you think you would like to do in the future? Counselor will read, Career Day and discuss the careers in the story. What was one of the careers in the story? What kind of tools did the person use? Students will play the game, “Who Am I?”* Counselor will ask questions about different careers and the tools they use. When a student answers the question, he will get the question card. The student who gets the most cards wins the game. What is your job today? How can you be successful at being a student? If you do not do a good job as being a student, then it will be difficult to have a good job in the future. Your future depends on what you do today.

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

     Students will share with the group what career they may want to have in the future. Students will discuss what they can do in school to achieve this goal.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

     Career Day by Anne Rockwell and Lizzy Rockwell, “Who Am I?” Game,

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

     All students will be able to state what their job is today and how they will be successful at their job.

     

    Second Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): C:A1.2  learn about the variety of traditional and nontraditional occupations,  C:C1.1 understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.2.3, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1.A.

     

    Essential Question(s):  What is a career? What are some careers that you may be interested in?

     

    Target Question(s): What is your job today? How does your success in the classroom today affect your future success?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will discuss their job as a student and how their job today affects their future. Students will become aware of the different types of careers.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

     What is your job today? You must be good in your job today if you are going to have a good job in the future. What job would you like to have in the future? Counselor will read ““How Santa Got His Job”.  What are some of the jobs Santa had? What duties did he have for his job? Was Santa successful at very job he chose? Did he give up when he was not suited for a certain job? He never gave up trying, so eventually he found the right job for him.

    Students will play “Career Bingo”. Counselor will tell a fact about the career and the students will find the career on their bingo card. As the students make a match, they must tell the counselor what the person does if he has this job and what tools he may use.

    What are some of the careers you learned about today? Which ones will you be interested in exploring?

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

     Students will share with the group what career they may want to have in the future. Students will discuss what they can do in school to achieve this goal.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

     How Santa Got His Job by Stephen Krensky, “Career Bingo I” by Mable Lee

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to state what their job is today and how they will be successful at their job.

     

    Third Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA C:A1.2  learn about the variety of traditional and nontraditional occupations,  C:C1.1 understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1.B

     

    Essential Question(s):  What is a career? What are some careers that you may be interested in? What is work? What are good and bad work habits?

    Target Question(s): What is your job today? How does your success in the classroom today affect your future success?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will discuss their job as a student and how their job today affects their future. Students will become aware of the different types of careers. Students will learn the difference between good and bad work habits.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

     What is work? Why did students have to work in school? What are some good work habits? What are some bad work habits? What is your job today? How can you improve your work habits to become better at your job? Each student will choose one work habit that he needs to change to have a better work ethic. What kind of job does your parent have? Students will be encouraged to talk to their parents about the careers in their family. What kind of work habits do they have? (getting up early, working late, wearing a uniform, must do what their employer says, getting along well with others). Counselor will show pictures of different kinds of careers and the students will name each career. Students will use the pictures to play “Career Charades”*. Each student will be given a pictures and he will have to act out the career for the rest of the group to guess. The student who guesses correctly will keep the picture of the career. The student with the most pictures will win the game.  Students will complete “A Career for Me” asking a student to choose one career they want to have in the future and giving some of the reasons why they chose that career.

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Student will share the career they chose and the reasons why they chose that career.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

     Career clip art pictures, “A Career for Me”

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to state what their job is today and how they will be successful at their job.

     

    Fourth Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA: C:A1.2  learn about the variety of traditional and nontraditional occupations,  C:A1.3 develop an awareness of personal abilities, skills, interests, and motivations, C:C1.1 understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.7, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1.B, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1.C

    Essential Question(s): 

    What is a career? What is a career cluster? What are some careers that you may be interested in?

     

    Target Question(s):

    What is your job today? How does your success in the classroom today affect your future success?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will discuss their job as a student and how their job today affects their future. Students will become aware of the different types of careers. Students will learn about the 16 Career Clusters. Student will choose three career interest areas suitable for their personality.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    What was your goal for last week? Were you able to meet your goal? What must you change to be able to meet your goal this week? What is your job today? Are you being successful at your job? If you do not try your best in the classroom today, will you be successful in the future? Counselor will discuss how the 16 Career Clusters are grouped by the same knowledge and skills to help students find more details about careers fields that interest them. Students will complete “Career Interest Survey” helping them find out what career clusters are more suitable to their personality. The students will choose three career interest areas that are suitable for their personality.

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Student will share the three career interest areas that are suited for their personality with the group and what jobs they are interested in exploring.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

     Career Wonders Interest Survey, SD Dept. of Labor and Regulation https://dlr.sd.gov/lmic/pdfs_and_other_files/cwonders_interest_survey.pdf

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

     All students will be able to state what their job is today and how they will be successful at their job.

    Fifth Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA: C:A1.2  learn about the variety of traditional and nontraditional occupations,  C:A1.3 develop an awareness of personal abilities, skills, interests, and motivations, C:C1.1 understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1.B,

     

    Essential Question(s):  What is a career? What is a career cluster? What are some careers that you may be interested in?

    Target Question(s): What is your job today? How does your success in the classroom today affect your future success?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

     Students will discuss their job as a student and how their job today affects their future. Students will become aware of different types of careers. Students will learn about the 16 Career Clusters. Student will choose three career interest areas suitable for their personality.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

      What was your goal for last week? Were you able to meet your goal? What must you change to be able to meet your goal this week? What is your job today? Are you being successful at your job? If you do not try your best in the classroom today, will you be successful in the future? Counselor will discuss how the 16 Career Clusters are grouped by the same knowledge and skills to help students find more details about careers fields that interest them. Students will complete “Career Interest Survey” helping them find out what career clusters are more suitable to their personality. The students will choose three career interest areas that are suitable for their personality.

      

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

     Student will share the three career interest areas that are suited for their personality with the group and what jobs they are interested in exploring.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

     Career Wonders Interest Survey, SD Dept. of Labor and Regulation https://dlr.sd.gov/lmic/pdfs_and_other_files/cwonders_interest_survey.pdf

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

     All students will be able to state what their job is today and how they will be successful at their job.


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  • Careers 3-5 Friendship K-2


    Kindergarten

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): : PS:A2.8  learn how to make and keep friends, PS:A2.7  know that communication involves speaking, listening, and nonverbal behavior, PS:A2.6  use effective communications skills, PS:A2.3  recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.K.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.K.1.

    Essential Question(s):  What is a friend? What are the characteristics of a friend?

    Target Question(s): How do you make friends? How can you keep friends?

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will identify the characteristics of a friend. Students will describe ways to start a conversation. Students will learn the importance of listening. Students will be able to use these skills to get along with others in the work place and in personal relationships.


    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

     Counselor will show the students the poster, “Make a Friend”. What does a friend look like? (all different) What does a friend act like? Friends listen and care about each other. Friends must help each other, share, and take turns. Friends have fun together. How can you make a friend? Smile and say “hello”. Ask, “What is your name? Do you want to play?” Wave goodbye when leaving.

    I am going to read a story about a new boy at school. As I read notice how the new boy may have felt. Counselor will read “Brand New Kid.” How did the boy feel at the new school? What happened in the story to make him feel sad? How did one girl help him? Should you look for someone who does not have a friend and include him in a game? Should we ever leave anyone out of a game when he wants to play? How do you ask a friend to play? A good friend smiles when he sees you. Students will perform a play: “Act like a Friend”. Students will practice introducing themselves to a friend. A good friend listens to what his friend is saying. Are you a good listener? We are going to play a game to find out who is listening.  The Counselor will play the Listening Game. Counselor will say a sentence in the ear of a students and that student will whisper it to another student until the sentence goes around the group and comes back to the Counselor.

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Students will role-play introducing themselves to make a new friend.

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    “Brand New Kid” by Katherine Couric,  “Act like a friend” on page 61 in “Too Good for Drugs” for Kindergarten, “Make a Friend” Poster

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to tell how to make a friend.

    First Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA

    PS:A2.8  learn how to make and keep friends, PS:A2.7  know that communication involves speaking, listening, and nonverbal behavior, PS:A2.6  use effective communications skills, PS:A2.3  recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.2

     

    Essential Question(s):  What is a friend? What are the characteristics of a friend?

    Target Question(s): How do you make friends? How can you keep friends?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will identify the characteristics of a friend and how to make a friend. Students will be able to use these skills to get along with others in the work place and in personal relationships.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

     What does a friend look like? (all different) What does a friend act like? Friends listen and care about each other. Friends must help each other, share, and take turns, Friends have fun together. Does anyone have trouble making friends? How can you make a friend? Smile and say “hello”. Ask someone to play with you. Counselor will read “The Trouble with Friends” How were Lizzy and Sister good friends? How did Lizzy and Sister make each other angry? Did Sister and Lizzy try to take turns being the teacher? Did Sister and Lizzy talk to each other and try to work out a solution to their problem? What do you do if someone is braggy or bossy? (Talk to them about taking turns) You should listen to your friend and try to work out the problem. A good friend cooperates with others. Students will play “Casey the Caring Caterpillar” Game. Counselor will ask students to answer questions about how to be a good friend. The student will be given a piece of the caterpillar puzzle for each correct answer.  The student who puts together the caterpillar first wins the game.

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

     Students will be able to answer the questions about how to become a good student.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    “The Trouble with Friends” by Stan and Jan Berenstain, Casey the Caring Caterpillar Game

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to tell how to make a friend.

     

    Second Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA

    PS:A2.8  learn how to make and keep friends, PS:A2.7  know that communication involves speaking, listening, and nonverbal behavior, PS:A2.6  use effective communications skills, PS:A2.3  recognize, accept, respect and appreciate individual differences, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.2

     

    Essential Question(s):  What is a friend? What are the characteristics of a friend?

    Target Question(s): How do you make friends? How can you keep friends? How do you choose a friend?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will identify the characteristics of a friend. Students will discuss how to choose friends. Students will demonstrate how to give and receive compliments. Students will be able to use these skills to get along with others in the work place and in personal relationships.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    What does a friend look like? What does a friend act like? Friends listen and care about each other. Friends must help each other, share, and take turns, Friends have fun together. How do you choose your friends? Some reasons for choosing friends are better than others. Describe the type of friend you would like to have. Students will complete “Checklist for a Friend” checking the type of person they think is a good friend. Looking good, wearing nice clothes, living in a big house, or having many toys does not make a person a good friend. Students will complete “To Have a Friend, Be a Friend”. Unfriendly messages will be corrected by writing a friendly message the friend should say in the bubble. Friends are all different, but there is one way that friends are the same. They all help each other and encourage each other. Students will complete “Dog-gone Good Compliments”. Students will learn to write a compliment and say “thank you”. Friends give compliments to encourage each other. Students will complete “Kindness Give a Compliment” flower. Students will write their name in the middle of the flower. Everyone in the group will write a compliment on the petals of the flower to the person whose name is written in the center of the flower. How does it feel to receive a compliment? Would you rather be given an insult or a compliment?

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Students will be able to give a compliment to everyone in the group. Students will be able to tell how to make friends and keep friends.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    “How to be a Friend” by Mendez Foundation, “Kindness Give a Compliment” flower

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to tell how to make a friend.

     

    Third Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA

    C:C1.1 understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success, C:C1.2 explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction, C:A1.7 understand the importance of planning CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1.B.

     

    Essential Question(s):  What career do you want to explore for the future? What steps must you take to achieve your career goal?

     

    Target Question(s): Does education play a major part in what you want to do in the future? How does what you do in school today help you with your future career?

     

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will be able to choose a career that they want to explore for the future. Students will use visualization to see themselves in their future career. Students will be able to plan the steps they must take to achieve their career goal.

     

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    Today we are going in a Time Machine 15 years into the future. How old will you be 15 years from now? You will have probably finished high school and college and would have already chosen a career for yourself. Can you imagine what kind of career you would choose for yourself? What does visualization mean? Counselor will explain visualization. Close your eyes and let’s time travel 15 years ahead. Picture yourself in your career. What would you be doing? What steps would you have to take to get there? Students will open their eyes.  You have to see something in your mind before you can accomplish it. If you want to become superstar in sports or on the stage, you must realize that only a very small percentage of people become superstars. What is your backup plan if you are not selected as one of those superstars? Does education play a major part in what you want to do in the future? How does what you do in school today help you with your future career? We are going to design a newspaper about what you will be doing 15 years from today. Write the date of that day at the top of the newspaper. Write a headline about you reaching your future career goal. Draw a picture of yourself achieving the career goal. Name the steps you must take to reach your career goal. Tell how you will celebrate starting your career. Students will complete “Too Good Gazette” designing the front page of a newspaper.

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

     Students will share their newspaper with the group.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    “Too Good Gazette” by Mendez Foundation

     

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

     All students will be able to choose a career that they want to explore for the future and  the steps they must take to achieve their career goal.

     

    Fourth Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA:

    C:B1.5  use research and information resources to obtain career information, C:B1.6  learn to use the internet to access career planning information, C:B1.8  understand how changing economic and societal needs influence employment trends and future training. C:B2.1  demonstrate awareness of the education and training needed to achieve career goals, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.4.7

     

    Essential Question(s):  What career do you want to explore for the future that matches your personality? What are some of the duties of this job?

    Target Question(s): What education do you need for this job?  How does what you do in school today help you with your future career?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will use the internet to explore careers that may match their personality interests as based on the career survey.

      

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    Students will review the results of their Career Survey which was taken last week. Students will research the career that they want to explore on the computer using the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook (http://www.bls.gov/ooh). Students will find the duties of the job, work environment, education and training, median annual wage, job outlook, and similar occupations.

      

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    The students will compile all essential information about the career they are exploring.

     

      Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    computer, “Finding My Career”

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will choose a career and know how much education it take to have this career.

     

      

    Fifth Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA:

    C:B1.5  use research and information resources to obtain career information, C:B1.6  learn to use the internet to access career planning information, C:B1.8  understand how changing economic and societal needs influence employment trends and future training. C:B2.1  demonstrate awareness of the education and training needed to achieve career goals, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.5.7

     

    Essential Question(s):  What career do you want to explore for the future that matches your personality? What are some of the duties of this job?

    Target Question(s): What education do you need for this job?  How does what you do in school today help you with your future career?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will use the internet to explore careers that may match their personality interests as based on the career survey.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice) 

    Students will review the results of their Career Survey which was taken last week. Students will research the career that they want to explore on the computer using the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook (http://www.bls.gov/ooh). Students will find the duties of the job, work environment, education and training, median annual wage, job outlook, and similar occupations.

      

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    The students will compile all essential information about the career they are exploring.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    computer, “Finding My Career”

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

     All students will choose a career and know how much education it take to have this career.

     

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  • Careers 4-5 Decision-making K-3


    Kindergarten

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA

    PS:A1.6  distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate behavior, PS:A1.7  recognize personal boundaries, rights, and privacy needs,  PS:A1.8  understand the need for self-control and how to practice it, PS:B1.1  use a decision-making and problem-solving model, PS:B1.7  demonstrate a respect and appreciation for individual and cultural differences, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.K.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.K.1

    Essential Question(s):  What process do you take to make a decision?

    Target Question(s): What is the difference between compliments and insults? How do your words affect others? What is the difference between positive and negative body language?

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will be able to identify the difference between compliments and insults. Students will identify positive and negative body language. Student will learn the decision making process: STOP and THINK BEFORE YOU SPEAK. Students will learn to make better decisions in the future.

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

     Your body language can be positive or negative towards others. Ask students to show positive body language: waving, blowing a kiss, come here, handshake. Ask students to show negative body language: rolling eyes, angry face, speak to the hand, turning face away from the person, folded arms. Your tone of voice can be positive or negative. Demonstrate: “That is mine! Give it back to me!” in two tones of voice. Counselor will read Words are not for Hurting.  What are compliments? What are insults? Discuss how insults affect your heart. Ask students to give an example of an insult.  The students must put an X on the paper heart each time they give an insult.  After students have given insults ask: “What happened to this heart? How might we feel if our heart looked like this?” Ask the student to give examples of compliments. Compare a new heart to the marked heart. “What is different about these hearts? What does this tell us about the effects of insults and compliments? Students will give compliments to each other. How did you feel when you received a compliment? Think of a time you were insulted. How did it feel to be insulted?  It is not easy to undo an insult. How can you stop hurting others with your words? You must remember to STOP and THINK before you say mean words to others. Students will learn STOP (hand showing STOP) and THINK (finger points to head) BEFORE YOU SPEAK (fingers will zip up mouth). Students will complete “Stop and Think” color sheet.

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Students will tell about a time someone insulted them and what they should do if this happens again.

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    Words Are Not for Hurting by Elizabeth Verdick, two hearts cut from construction paper, marker, “Stop and Think” worksheet.

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.) All students will be able to state the decision making process using hand signals.

    First Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA

    PS:A1.6  distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate behavior, PS:A1.8  understand the need for self-control and how to practice it, PS:B1.1  use a decision-making and problem-solving model, PS:C1.2  learn about the relationship between rules, laws, safety, and the protection of rights of the individual, PS:C1.7  apply effective problem-solving and decision-making skills to make safe and healthy choices, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.1.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.1.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.1.2

     

    Essential Question(s):  What process do you take to make a decision?

    Target Question(s): What is a consequence? How do bad decisions affect your life? Do you have to take responsibility for the bad decisions that you make?

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn that they are responsible for making positive choices. Students will be able to follow the steps in the decision-making process: Stop and think. Students will be able to define consequence and predict possible consequences. Students will learn to make better decisions in the future.

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    Counselor will discuss consequences- what happens next after you do something. Every decision has consequences whether good or bad. You hit someone, then you go to the office. You are nice to someone, and you make a new friend. You must learn to make decisions that will keep you safe and healthy. Sometimes your friends try to influence you to make the wrong decisions. Stop and think before about what will happen before you make a decision. I am going to read you a story about Proud Rooster. Look for the reason why they called him Proud Rooster. Counselor will read “Proud Rooster and Little Hen” Did Proud Rooster stop and think before he made a decision? What happened to him because he did not stop and think first? What happened to him at the end of the story? Students will complete “Stop and Think about the Consequences” discussing the bad consequences that happened to Wagner when he made bad choices  Counselor will read a decision card and students must tell the counselor what decision they would make in each case. Students will discuss times they made bad decisions and what happened. Students will complete “Stop and Think”.

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Counselor will read a decision card and students must tell the counselor what decision they would make in each case.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    Proud Rooster and Little Hen by Carl Sommers, “Stop and Think about the Consequences” by Mendez Foundation, Decision cards, “Stop and Think”, 

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to state the decision making process using hand signals.

     

     

    Second Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA

    PS:A1.6  distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate behavior, PS:A1.7  recognize personal boundaries, rights, and privacy needs,  PS:A1.8  understand the need for self-control and how to practice it, PS:B1.1  use a decision-making and problem-solving model, PS:B1.7  demonstrate a respect and appreciation for individual and cultural differences, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.1.A, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.2.2

    Essential Question(s):  What process do you take to make a decision?

    Target Question(s): What is a consequence? How do your words affect others? How do bad decisions affect your life?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will be able to follow the steps in the decision-making process: Stop and think. Students will learn how angry words hurt others. Students will be able to define consequence. Students will learn that they are responsible for making positive choices.

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    Counselor will discuss consequences. Every decision has consequences whether good or bad. You hit someone, then you go to the office. You are nice to someone, and then you make a new friend. The words you say have consequences. Our angry words can affect everyone around us. Read: “Andrew’s Angry Words”. How did Andrew’s words affect the people around him?  What could his sister have done to stop the angry words? What could Andrew have done to stop the angry words? Counselor will show a heart made out of construction paper. Ask students to give an example of an insult. Have the student poke a hole in the heart with a pencil after he says the insult. After students have all given an insult ask: “What happened to this heart? How might we feel if our heart looked like this? What can we do to help make the heart feel better? Ask students to give an example of a compliment. Counselor will push construction paper back into place where hole was made in the heart. Compare a new heart to the damaged heart. What is different about them? What does this tell us about the effects of insults? (Not easy to undo an insult, because they last for a long time.) What do we need to be sure to do when we are angry? STOP and THINK before we speak. What should you do if you do say angry words? Students will be given a heart and a piece of construction paper. Students will paste the heart to the construction paper and write: “Stop and Think before you Speak” on the paper. Students will write kind or helpful words on the heart.

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Students will tell kind or helpful words that can be used instead of insults.

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    Andrew’s Angry Words by D. Lachner and Tjong-King, construction paper, hearts cut from construction paper.

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to state the decision making process using hand signals.

     

    Third Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA

    . PS:A1.6  distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate behavior, PS:A1.7  recognize personal boundaries, rights, and privacy needs,  PS:A1.8  understand the need for self-control and how to practice it, PS:B1.1  use a decision-making and problem-solving model, PS:B1.7  demonstrate a respect and appreciation for individual and cultural differences, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.3.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.3.1.B

     

    Essential Question(s):  What process do you take to make a decision?

     

    Target Question(s): Does education play a major part in what you want to do in the future? How does what you do in school today help you with your future career? What does it mean to respect other people? What are some techniques to stop teasing? How do your words affect others?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will learn how to respect others. Student will learn 5 teasing strategies. Students will demonstrate teasing strategies. Students will understand how respecting others will help them become successful in the future. Students will learn the decision-making process.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    Counselor will ask the students: Today we will be talking about having respect for others. What does it mean to respect other people? (Treat others the way you would like to be treated) Is there anything you dislike about the way people treat each other here at school? How do you feel when you see others being teased? What do you like most about the way people treat each other here at school? Does it have anything to do with respect? What is one way that you can make sure you respect others? Stop and Think Before you Speak.  Read “Simon’s Hook”. What did Simon do to stop the teasers without “taking the bait”? (ignore, agree, change the subject, stay away, use humor) Did he STOP and THINK before he answered the teasers? We are all different. We see things differently, hear things differently, and understand things differently. Just because someone is different than you, you should not tease the person, but give the person a chance and get to know him. What happens when these techniques don't work? Who is your "Grandma Rose"? Who is an adult you could go to for good ideas and help? Students will be given a fish and they will write “When I am teased, I will ….” on the fish. Students will share what technique they will use on a teaser.  Students will role-play with a partner what teasing technique they will use when given an insult. Counselor will provide teasing remarks, such as “You are so dumb” or “That shirt is ugly”.

     

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Students will role-play with a partner what teasing technique they will use when given an insult.

     

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    Simon’s Hook by Karen Gedig Burnett, Role Play Cards. BAIT fish-one for each student

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

     All students will be able to state the decision making process using hand signals.

     

    Fourth Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA:

    C:B2.1  demonstrate awareness of the education and training needed to achieve career goals, C:C1.1  understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success, C:C1.2  explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.4.9, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1.B, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.1.C

    Essential Question(s):  What kind of education or training do you need for your future career?

     

    Target Question(s): How can you prepare for your future career? How can working hard in class help you feel better about yourself?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will compare and contrast the career they chose to explore with other students’ careers. Student will create an image of themselves in the future. Students will put essential information about the career they explored on their image.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice)

    Students will review the results of their research which was completed last week with the counselor. Students will compare and contrast the career that they explored on the computer with the findings of other students. What do you notice about the median salary and the amount of education or training needed? Are you paid more money for more education and training? How can you have success in the future? If you work hard in the classroom, will you have success in the classroom? Do you feel better about yourself when you do your very best? Students will create an image of themselves in their future career. Students will write on their image the name of the career, career cluster, duties of the job, education and training, and median annual wage.

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Students will share their Career Image with the group.

     

    1.      Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    “Finding My Career” (completed from last week), Career Image

     

    2.      Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to state the amount of education they will need for their future career.

     

    Fifth Grade

    Standards  Addressed (CCSS, MS Science Frameworks, MS Social Studies Frameworks): ASCA:

    C:B2.1  demonstrate awareness of the education and training needed to achieve career goals, C:C1.1  understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success, C:C1.2  explain how work can help to achieve personal success and satisfaction, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.5.5, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1, CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.5.1.B.

    Essential Question(s):  What kind of education or training do you need for your future career?

     

    Target Question(s): How can you prepare for your future career? How can working hard in class help you feel better about yourself?

     

    Relevance/Rationale: (Why are the outcomes of this lesson important in the real world? Why are these outcomes essential for future learning?)

    Students will compare and contrast the career they chose to explore with other students’ careers. Students will understand the relationship between educational achievement and career success.

     

    Procedures: (Teacher Directed Instruction/Modeling, Guided Practice, Independent Practice) 

    Students will review the findings of the career that they explored on the computer. Students will work together in pairs. Students will compare and contrast their career findings with another student’s career findings. Students will present the differences in their jobs to the group. After comparing your career with another career, did you see the advantages and disadvantages of the career you chose to explore? What do you notice about the median salary and the amount of education or training needed? Are you paid more money for more education and training? How can you have success in the future? If you work hard in the classroom, will you have success in the classroom? Do you feel better about yourself when you do your very best?

     

    Criteria for Success (closure activity): (How will you & your students know if they have successfully met the outcomes? What specific criteria will be met in a successful product/process? What does success on this lesson’s outcomes look like?)

    Students will tell the group the steps they will take to achieve their career goal.

     

    Resources/Materials/Artifacts: (What texts, digital resources, & materials will be used in this lesson?)

    “Finding My Career” (completed from last week), “Contrast and Compare Careers”

     

    Access for All:  (How will you ensure that all students have access to and are able to engage appropriately in this lesson? Consider all aspects of student diversity.)

    All students will be able to state the amount of education they will need for their future career.

     

     

     


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